Monday, May 28, 2012

Beka's Recipes: Sourdough Scones





Sourdough is has a hearty, slightly tart flavor that is very appetizing. This recipe is  similar to my pumpkin scones recipe. 

Sourdough contains naturally-occuring yeast and is full of enzymes that break down anti-nutrient phytates in grains, making it more nutritious and digestible.Too much sourdough, however, usually yields a distinctly unpleasant, overpowering, sour-tasting, baked product.

350gm bread flour (you can replace up to a third of the bread flour with wheat germ or whole wheat flour for added nutrition)
1/4 cup to 1/2 cup white sugar or honey (the pumpkin is sweet, too)
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt

75gm butter
140gm  (1 1/4) cup liquid sourdough starter

2 tbsp milk, to brush

Baking: 200C or 400F Oven for about 30-40 minutes

1) Prepare the sourdough starter by mixing 1 1/2 cups of flour, 1 1/2 cups of water, and 1/4 cup sourdough starter. Let it rise/ferment overnight.
2) Measure the flour into a large mixing bowl. Mix the cream of tartar, baking soda, sugar (if you are using sugar and not honey), and salt into the flour. Rub the butter in until it becomes fine breadcrumbs. You can use a stand/hand mixer.
3) Add in the sourdough starter. (and honey) and incorporate it well. It should form a stiff but very sticky dough. Use more sourdough starter if necessary.
4) Coat your counter well with plain flour. Pat the dough, coating it well and both sides with flour and cut it out into circles. One batch will yield 12 large scones or 16 little ones (3 inches wide and 1 inch tall)
5) Brush the remainder milk on the tops of the scones. Arrange them on a well-greased baking tray and bake until golden brown on the top and bottom and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean
6) Enjoy fresh, sliced in half and spread with salted butter or jam for tea. Store the scones in the freezer to preserve their freshness.


Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Beka's Recipes: Pumpkin Scones 南瓜烤饼


This quick and easy recipe for Pumpkin scones yields a delightfully yellow scone, gently browned on the surface. It is sweet and rich when you bite into it, and the fluffy texture comes from the exceptionally moist dough. You can enhance the scone batter with raisins or bits of dried apricot.


350gm bread flour (you can replace up to a third of the bread flour with wheat germ or whole wheat flour for added nutrition)
1/4 cup to 1/2 cup white sugar or honey (the pumpkin is sweet, too)
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt

75gm butter
300gm cooked and mashed pumpkin
About 1/3 - 1/2 cup of milk, as necessary

Baking: 200C or 400F Oven for about 30-40 minutes

1) Wash and cut a medium-sized fresh pumpkin into quarters. Steam, microwave, or bake the pumpkin until it is very soft, so that you can scoop out the pumpkin flesh from the skin. It should be very moist and easy to mash. Mash the pumpkin and weigh it. A medium-sized pumpkin should yield about two batches of this recipe.
2) Measure the flour into a large mixing bowl. Mix the cream of tartar, baking soda, sugar (if you are using sugar and not honey), and salt into the flour. Rub the butter in until it becomes fine breadcrumbs. You can use a stand/hand mixer.
3) Add in the pumpkin (and honey) and incorporate it well. It should form a stiff and moist dough. Mix in up to a cup of milk so that the dough is very moist and sticky.
4) Coat your counter well with plain flour. Pat the dough, coating it well and both sides with flour and cut it out into circles. One batch will yield 12 large scones or 16 little ones (3 inches wide and 1 inch tall)
5) Brush the remainder milk on the tops of the scones. Arrange them on a well-greased baking tray and bake until golden brown on the top and bottom and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean
6) Enjoy fresh, sliced in half and spread with salted butter for tea. Store the scones in the freezer to preserve their freshness.




面包 低粉 350克、
细砂糖 75克、
塔塔粉 1 茶匙
小苏打 1 茶匙
盐  1/2 茶匙

无盐奶油 75克、

煮熟的南瓜 300克、
1/2杯牛奶



1. 剪下一个中等大小的新鲜南瓜分为四个部分。煮南瓜,直到它很软。舀出皮肤软的南瓜。捣碎的南瓜,然后测量它。一个中等大小的南瓜,应该至少有600克。

2. 混合面粉,糖,塔塔粉,小苏打和盐。黄油切成小块,用你的双手揉进面粉,黄油,直到它类似于细屑。

3. 面粉中加入捣碎的南瓜和牛奶。以及混合面团。

4. 入炉200°C,烤约30-40分钟,表面呈金黄色,出炉,趁温热即可食用。


Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Fiddler on the Roof Costume Study Part 1

Fiddler on the Roof is set in the fictional Ashkenazi community in Russia, Anatevka. The original book by Sholom Aleichem on which the movie was based was published in 1894. I think the film is set from 1904. Fiddler on the Roof differs greatly from Yentl. For one thing, Fiddler is filmed in more impoverished circumstances, picturing poor farming families etching out their living, whereas Yentl, and Hadass especially, have quite decent clothes and homes, lavish and prosperous in Hadass's case.

Not so with Tevye and his five daughters, Tzeitel, Hodel, Chava, Shprintze, and Bielke. Their father is not a rabbi but a milkman, who delivers milk to both Gentile and Jew. He has no time to study, but must work hard for a living. They, too, are seem tilling the soil. In fact, the entire film was filmed through pantyhose to give the adobe-brown hue. The family is literally living close to nature and the soil.



First we shall examine the everyday working clothes of the girls. Secondly, the Sabbath outfits, then the wedding outfits, then the sweet dresses in "Chavalah", and finally winter clothes.



Tzeitel is the oldest, and in my opinion the most beautiful. She has the most gorgeous nose and face, very well-defined and sculptured. You will notice throughout the film that all the girls and women dress like true Orthodox Jews, with long sleeves and long skirts and high necklines. Golde, and later Tzeitel, covers her hair completely as she is married. Some women, like Yente, tie their headscarves in front.


The tone of most of the work-clothing is soil-like. Obviously the clothes are not fresh and new, but rather much-worn. For the blouses, you can see that Golde's workdress has a yoked bodice.


 Because this is the Edwardian era with the mutton sleeves coming into fashion, blouses were "little-house-on-the-prairie-like". You can see here that Hodel has puffy sleeves on her beige work-blouse. The work-blouses all button in front.

 Here, the lady next to Tzeitel have some vertical folds on her blouse design, also common to this era.


Small, faded prints are common both for the scarves and the blouses. The girls mostly wear a headscarf, a work-blouse, an apron, and a long skirt. The girls tie up their hair in a triangle piece of fabric. This is a simple hair-do. The hair is kept away from the face. You can see they have long, frizzy, hair that is at least waist-length.





Most aprons tie at the back and are of varying length. Here one of the younger daughters is wearing a white pinafore. This style of apron is mostly seen on younger girls. It has a bodice. You can also notice the details put in the costume designer - it has a light blue patch, signifying that it has been worn often, and most likely handed down.




 The younger girls also wear tichels (headscarves) when working and have long hair. This sweet little girl has a beautiful pink and white outfit.













So, this is the full work-costume of the girls and women in Fiddler on the Roof.